Design Thinking in Education

20 Oct

Next month, we’ll have Google’s Chris McQueen leading a design thinking session with the Dartmouth community as part of our STEM Speaker Series. Design Thinking is a process that can be applied to all sorts of areas including society, education, personal, etc. It teaches how to use empathy and brainstorming to image change and improvement through prototyping and testing out of ideas.

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Neuroscience Expert visits Dartmouth

16 Sep

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Ariel Waldman Speaking at Dartmouth on Thursday, April 28

26 Apr

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PDF version of poster:  STEM speaker series_4-28

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STEM Girls from San Jose are Changing Face of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

28 Feb

Dartmouth Middle School (DMS) in San Jose has slowly but steadily been building up their STEM portfolio of classes and clubs. Now with two full-time STEM teachers who offer nine different quarter-long classes along with seven before/after school clubs and classes, the school is a bona-fide STEM powerhouse.  Most of DMS’s classes are based on the nationwide program, Project Lead The Way (PLTW).

The goal of the DMS STEM program is to expose all students to the creative and social impactfulness of science and engineering as well as provide more depth and fluency in these fields.  “We’ve noticed that students, especially the girls, really gravitate towards the projects that have a creative and local impact”, explains Tracy Brown who teaches the green architecture and flight/space classes.  Most of the courses have a capstone project where the students use their new skills to develop a solution for a client, and the results have been quite impressive. Last year a female student who took the design/modeling class developed a dry-erase holder that is currently patent-pending.

One of the most exciting characteristics of the program is that the classes are on the exploratory wheel so the classes usually have as many girls enrolled in them as boys.  DMS has the philosophy that middle school is the perfect time for children to be open to all kinds of skills to see what resonates and what doesn’t. Then they can elect their classes in high school with more background knowledge. In addition to the STEM classes, DMS also has an award-winning band program and a selection of drama and cultural literacy classes on the exploratory wheel.

A team of fifteen girls, called the STEM Girls, have put together a presentation where they enthusiastically demonstrate the breadth of the DMS program. They also gush about their new STEM building that just opened in January. It has a very open and green design, complete with solar tubes, nanawalls, and all natural wall coverings. “The building looks like a Google or Facebook office. The kids are just so excited to work and create in the space. They’ve joked that they never want to leave it.”, says Pam Rissmann who teaches the design/modeling, robotics, and computer science courses.

Currently there is a shortage of women in STEM fields. This is particularly true for physics, electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, and computer science. The nerdy, Big Bang Theory stereotypes don’t help the cause. However, these girls have discovered the fun and coolness of designing and discovering, and they are now working to dispel this long worn, overused image of the scientist and engineer.

The STEM Girls next speaking gig will be on April 23 at the Santa Clara County STEAM Symposium.  Please contact Pam Rissmann at rissmannp@unionsd.org  if you are interested in learning more about the STEM Girls.File Dec 10, 1 06 53 PMFile Jan 31, 12 03 23 PMFile Jan 31, 12 02 45 PMFile Jan 31, 12 03 05 PM

Dartmouth STEM Faire 2016

23 Jan

 

Dartmouth Middle School in San Jose is hosting a STEM Faire on Wednesday, February 10, 2016 from 5:30pm to 8:30pm. We’ll spend the evening showcasing the middle and high school STEM programs (3d printing, robotics, computer science, flight and space, green architecture, etc) as well as providing hands-on activities.  Last year we had over 400 attendees from the community and had several leading hi-tech companies. This year we’ll have Google, Lockheed Martin, Xilinx, BioCurious, The Computer Museum,  and many more. This year will be even bigger and better as we unveil our new state of the art and very green STEM building.

School Address
Dartmouth Middle School
5575 Dartmouth Drive
San Jose, CA 95118

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Here’s some photos and press we got last year:

STEM Faire 2015-press

 

 

 

Solving Problems: One 3d Model at a Time

5 Dec

In my PLTW Design and Modeling class, I have an assignment called the “Client Design Project.”  The assignment is introduced after the students have mastered sketching techniques like isometric and orthogonal drawings, and after the students have created several dimensioned models in Autodesk Inventor (a trophy, a foam block tower, a pegboard toy, a bracket, etc.).

The assignment begins with this worksheet: ClientDesignProject, which is a graphic organizer that helps the student step through the engineering design cycle.

  1. For the first step in the project,  the student is to interview an adult client in order to discover an issue/annoyance/need that the student may be able to help out with via a designed product.
  2. Once the problem has been identified, then the student brainstorms three possible solutions and sketches them out.
  3. Next the student chooses one solution and creates a detailed 3d dimensioned sketch of the solution before modeling the design in Autodesk Inventor.
  4. Now we 3d print it. The student designer is so excited and proud to hold their creation in their hands, and they can’t wait to share it with their client.
  5. After talking and experiencing the product, the student reflects on changes they would make if they continued working on the project.
  6. Lastly, the student prepares a slide presentation that chronicles their design process and presents it to the class.

Note: Next time I do this project with the kids, I think I will have them start their presentation document right after step 2. And then I will have them share the problem description and brainstormed ideas with the entire class to get feedback which may help them improve the solution.

This class project has brought a lot of success. Last year, an 8th grade student, Alexis Janosik, designed a white board marker holder for her math teacher after she noticed that when lecturing he’s always wasting time by searching  around the white board tray and his desk for a particular color pen in order to better describe a math problem. The product is currently patent pending: see Mercury News Article.

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Math teacher  now uses Alexis’ white board pen holder on daily basis.

Other client design projects have included Apple Watch stands, replacement parts for broken household appliances, and many others creative ideas. See photos below.

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Students Create Apps That Solve Problems

24 Nov

Students in my Introduction to Computer Science I class used the Your Turn assignment to get creative and build substantial applications. The project was introduced by showing the students last year’s winning apps from the Verizon Innovative App Challenge. It demonstrated how apps can help solve and bring awareness to important problems and social causes. Afterwards, I asked my students to build an application that has academic or social value to their peers.

Students rose to the challenge, and planned and created all kinds of interesting and useful applications; everything from an app to track charity donations to a mood lifting app to an app that helps girls get out of uncomfortable situations. The students followed the engineering design cycle by brainstorming ideas and sketching out GUIs before beginning to code.

When students finished their projects, they created a slideshow of their development process and got constructive feedback from their peers. I used the following protocol: students present without interruption, then students provide feedback using particular sentence starters, and then presenters respond to feedback. The sentence starters included “I like how…” and “I wonder if …”. These starters helped keep all input positive and constructive. Below is an excerpt from the student presentation of the Getaway app which allows girls to fake a phone call from someone in order to escape an uncomfortable or risky situation.